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Archive for August, 2012

  A peek at  HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

 Author, D.J. Houston

My little pet skunk, Stripey, wasn’t little anymore …

So you couldn’t tell him anything.  And Sweetie – the possum I fed in the woods every night so she wouldn’t go grubbing in Mama’s garden – just waddled away, oblivious, if I even so much as thought about broaching the subject.

When it finally came right down to it, the only person I could get to just sit there and hear me out was Mama Dog’s fluffy pup, Rowdy. . .

But what was the use?  I was a goner . . .

C L I C K  for “Heartland America Warning”

Copyright©2008, 2012 D.J. Houston. All Rights Reserved.

Humorous Stories – Mystery Novel – Life Lessons – American Literature Treasures

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A favorite from HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

 Author, D.J. Houston

You can call it bribery if you want to, I don’t care.  Other than the possibility of getting to see pickled brains in a jar, I was looking forward to going to school about as much as slopping hogs for the rest of my life . . .

But I was pretty sure God would forgive me   . . .

C L I C K  H E R E  for  “SCHOOL RUMOR HUMOR”

Copyright©2008, 2012 D.J. Houston. All Rights Reserved.

American Tall Tales – Humorous Stories – Mystery Novel – Historical Fiction Books

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~ from the novel HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

“Curiosity might kill a cat eventually, but I was incorrigibly willing to risk such things . . .”

Apparently, the gods of curiosity were destined to call upon me again — only this time to investigate a different class of enigmatic stuff.  But it quite enchanted me.

So off I flew, into what was left of my summer of junk and treasure, to excavate signs of an ancient world — like arrowheads and beads of shell and little, carved hardwood totems.

Sometimes I’d find a rotting weapon handle or a fishing spear or such, washed up in the mud of a creek bank.  And always clay vessels and pottery shards with faded, pigment markings and whatever Native rarities I could scrape from the hills and fields of Havenwood or reclaim from the secret woods that nestled our community. . . (more…)

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