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Posts Tagged ‘WW II’

Honoring Our Brave on Memorial Day

America Thanks You for Freedom !

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Trudie’s Tribute to WW II Veterans

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Mystery Novel – Social Commentary – 1940s – Inspiring Stories – Heartland America

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Brand new peek at HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

D.J. Houston, Author

There were fourteen of us, the last of Havenwood Township’s Depression-era babies born in a flurry before America’s role in the war was sealed at Pearl Harbor . . .

Out In The Country by Paula Ford

Out In The Country by Paula Ford

And while none of us were the first young minds fresh off the farm to gather there, nor destined to be the last, the question as to how Miss Greenlee could captivate the attention of that motley gang of six and seven-year-old renegades I found myself surrounded by – much less ever teach us the same subject at the same time – might easily beg for a miracle. But two things were certain . . .

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HA P P Y  4th of  J U L Y,  AMERICA !

Enjoy a look back at AMERICA from the coming novel HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings by D.J. Houston

Faith In America by Donald Zolan

Before the second half of 20th Century America happened to her citizens, most kids who weren’t beat up too much for their choices were fairly capable — able to focus their attention on the world in front of them long enough to finish a task and get something done on their own.

Even in the cities, even during wartime, people looked out for each other’s kids . . .

As for what happened to the nation and to the minds and morals of her people in the decades that followed  . . .

C L I C K   H E R E  to READ

“Common Sense Freedom – Heartland America”

Copyright©2007, 2013 D.J. Houston. All Rights Reserved.

Mystery Novel – Historical Fiction – Intrigue – Social Commentary – American Literature Treasures

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I hadn’t pictured my mother away from her home and work routines since the factory days of the war.  But this peaceful, natural setting seemed to suit her to her core.

I realized she’d brought me here for a reason.

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From HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

D.J. Houston, Author

Mystery Novel – Coming of Age – Inspiring Stories – Life Lessons – American Literature Treasures

Copyright©2010, 2012 D.J. Houston. All Rights Reserved.

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FATHER’S  DAY MEMORIES

from HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

“I was letting the strength of his quiet nature spread slowly around me, like calm on a morning pond.”

Havenwood Morning PondHe reminded me of a sycamore tree with his tall, lean build and sturdy limbs.  His skin was white when he rolled up his sleeves to wash his hands in the wintertime.   And his hair was as shiny black as a raven’s wing, only curly.

He had a sort of handsome face, I thought, with a high forehead like Timmy’s and hazel eyes like mine.  But I was just beginning to see him as more than some stranger who’d been smart enough to marry Mama . . .

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“Victory for America – Home and War”

From the novel HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings by D.J. Houston

Copyright©2006, 2013 D.J. Houston. All Rights Reserved.

Historical Fiction – Mystery Novel – WW II – American Family Life

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Excerpts from HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

by D.J. Houston

~ Honoring My Father on Memorial Day  ~

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My first pearl appeared the summer I turned six, not long after Daddy and Uncle Arthur returned from the Second World War . . .

It was a time of new necessity for Man.  For despite any halt to the march of evil, that war had turned humanity inside out when the white-hot specter of an atom bomb shocked and awed a pre-dawn New Mexico desert and twice carried death to Japan.

Yet no one could begin to grasp the consequences; it was too impossible to confront that such a thing as an atom bomb could ever happen in the first place.

Even after the war, top-secret scientists kept right on with the military to convince each other, time and again, that bombs do, indeed explode, while regular Joe civilian had no clue of such experiments.  And anyone who might have been aware felt powerless to stop them.  So they did nothing.

Post-WW II Heartland America

Families were reunited with their military loved ones the world over, and did what they could to reorient them to whatever became of their lost years at home.

Most made the transition; all were scarred.  But I’d like to think it was easier for the battle-weary to recover in a place like Havenwood . . .

Livestock and chickens and barns and crops and bank accounts needed tending, leaving little time to ruminate about the war.  And with new enterprises springing up as manufacturing shifted to producing wares and gadgets for the new Consumer Age, earning opportunities outside the home soon grew abundant for adults and young folks alike.

Not that play wasn’t fun and important to youth back then; if anything, a crippling Great Depression with a Second World War on its heels had led Americans of every age to value their freedoms and pleasures more than ever.

But work is its own reward.  If you don’t believe me, ask someone who has none.  And with more choices that come to a freer people, we could enjoy work more than ever, too.

All the kids I knew did chores, before and after school.  And those who had already proven themselves as volunteers for war efforts on the home front had a long leg up when it came to getting hired for the paying jobs.

With no TV screens to spectate at for hours on end, and decades yet before the advent of ubiquitous shopping mall arcades, video games, and personal phones and computers, young people tended to play hands-on at the game of growing up.

They practiced the real deal with real people, in an insular world without internet . . .

~

Author, D.J. Houston

Copyright©2007, 2014 D.J. Houston. All Rights Reserved.

Historical Fiction – Memoir Novels – Life Journey – Coming of Age – Social Commentary

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From the Mystery Novel HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings by D.J. Houston

Faith In America by Donald Zolan

Before the second half of 20th Century America happened to her citizens, most kids who weren’t beat up too much for their choices were fairly safe and capable — able to focus their attention on the world in front of them long enough to finish a task and get something done on their own without fear of harm. . .

Even young children could be sent to run an errand, trusted not to meet an early end by a generation of parents and grandparents whose worst fear was that a youngster might actually starve to death if he didn’t learn some skills and self-reliance. And even in the cities, even during wartime, people looked out for each other’s kids . . .

Everybody knew their neighbors, anyway, at least around Havenwood. Scum didn’t stand much of a chance.

As for what happened to the nation and to the minds and morals of her people and their leaders in the decades that followed, it wasn’t television or movies or video games or computers, not guns or even the internet wars and poison food and water that turned out to be the real hidden culprit — as folks in a new awakening would come to realize.

And though the bigger story of who and why and how the money trails connected still lurked behind the scenes . . .

Suffice it to say that, when I was a child, the art of dumbing down humanity with drugs and glorifying violence to masquerade as “culture” under the guise of “human nature” and “news of the day” had not fully taken hold yet as the modus operandi to convince folks life was dangerous, so they wouldn’t look too deep.

People in places like Havenwood could still seek solace in their churches.  And there was still contentment to be found in the plain, old-fashioned friendliness of small town life, and common sense in family.

That the grownups in my early youth weren’t terrorized by a constant barrage of televised bad news sandwiched between phony-baloney commercials was a godsend.  The ominous newspaper headlines and spurious hawkings of must-have wares and miracle cures on the radio were bad news enough back then.

Bad News, School Shootings and “Happy Pills”. . .


 
But we didn’t have a TV yet.  And we didn’t subscribe to the newspaper.  And by 1946, the radio no longer had a war to report.

No one at my house was very interested in bad news, anyway.  And except for old Miss Hickey, nobody at school cared much about it, either.

We didn’t even have school shootings when I was a kid.  No student would dream of bringing a gun to school in the first place, now that the war was over, unless they needed it to shoot some supper on the way home.  They could just store their guns in the principal’s gun case, next to his.

As for the day of fearing one’s child might fall prey to some counselor dispensing make-you-crazy “happy pills” to adjust their behavior if they wiggled too much or (god forbid) they thought outside the box, the idea of turning children into zombies was so far-fetched, it would have been hard to imagine even a Nazi Germany could have thought that one up. . .

Which is all to say that during those fleeting years between wars, in mid-20th Century Heartland America, life was safer for a child for awhile — especially a curious and outspoken one like me.  And able to live a life less influenced by artificial style and false opinion, with plenty of worthwhile work to go around, kids enjoyed a lot more freedom in general.

And so it was, in early summer 1946, that I could wander off unfettered from our family picnic at Silver Bear Lake on a gorgeous Saturday morning, leaving my brother Timmy to fish and run wild with our stair-stepped trio of freckle-faced, farm boy cousins while the grownups played their dominoes.

And with my little belly full of fried chicken and buttery biscuits, I set out to investigate a rare and fascinating day, indeed . . .

Excerpts from the Coming Novel HAVENWOOD TALES Beginnings

D.J. Houston, Author

Copyright©2007, 2013 D.J. Houston. All Rights Reserved.


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Social Commentary – WW II – Historical Fiction – Mystery Novel – American Literature Treasures

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